July 29th, 2014

edwarddespard:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

lesmisoz:

The original Les Miserables manuscript arrives in Melbourne.

jfc Hugo no wonder you had a stroke

Traveling to Melbourne this weekend to see the musical and the exhibition ….

audreyii-fic:

Hey, remember when we thought this was, like, a fun superhero parody with silly songs and whatnot? And we all laughed and laughed? And then the last five minutes happened?

Remember that?

I DO.

(via iverae)

dutchster:

do twins ever realize one of them was unplanned

(via shehasnoproblemwithsecrets)

July 28th, 2014
samlicker87:

This is still my favorite comic ever

samlicker87:

This is still my favorite comic ever

(Source: humorstop, via do-you-hear-the-fangirls-scream)

johnlockinthetardiswithdestiel:

bill-holmes:

tardis221b:

teacupsandnetflix:

It cracks me up when the actors on a show are also the producers because I always picture them casting themselves like

"Who’ll play the main character? Ah yes. Me."

image

sorry but

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image

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u can’t beat the monuments men

umm excuse u

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image

don’t mess with the Polar Express

(via do-you-hear-the-fangirls-scream)

vegan-vulcan:

raccoon-eater:

lacigreen:

lalatinafeminista:

toomanyfuckscrusader:

hiddlefun:

cloudcuckoolander527:

talisguy:

Signal boosting in case anyone needed to know this. 

This is informative as heck. Show this to everyone!

This is actually some great info! Why can’t they teach this kind of thing in school??

Wow, I’ve taken health and sex ed three times during my educational process and never learned any of this. Thanks.

Definitely some important information here!

this is supa awesome.  i do think it should be noted that side effects of EC *really* vary.  when I took EC I didn’t have any symptoms whatsoever.  

The more you know~

When I took EC, my period went missing for three months. Freaked me the hell out, despite having negative pregnancy tests. You cannot imagine how relieved I was to have it back.

(Source: rememberthstars, via nickmonkey)

      ”There is no law that gods must be fair, Achilles,” Chiron said. “And perhaps it is the greater grief, after all, to be left on earth when another is gone. Do you think?”

➵ the song of achilles, by madeline miller

(Source: queerpotters)

happy father’s day! 
↳ favorite dads — keith mars, veronica mars (2004-2007)

who’s your daddy?

(Source: callieamity, via picardspajamas)

etoiies:

some of my favorite gems from the @GOPTeens twitter account

(via dingdongyouarewrong)

buffylives:

At last. You must be Torchwood. My team bitch about you all the time.

(via theblueboxonbakerstreet)

reistrider:

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right 

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.


Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!
This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.
Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

From the first article: “Increased female independence was also perceived as a threat to male power and patriarchy, especially as Victorian women increasingly volunteered outside the home for religious and charitable causes.”

reistrider:

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.

Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!

This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.

Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

From the first article: “Increased female independence was also perceived as a threat to male power and patriarchy, especially as Victorian women increasingly volunteered outside the home for religious and charitable causes.”

(via nickmonkey)