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Faith: You give it to the people you love, but the people who really deserve it are the ones who come through even when you don’t love them enough

House Martell: Not your erotic, not your exotic

rumaan:

(title taken from the poem of the same name by Suheir Hammad)

I’m crawling out of my little fandom hole because three episodes in, I’m becoming increasingly irritated at how Oberyn Martell and the Dornish on a whole are being portrayed in Game of Thrones.

Apparently, when not attending…

joffri:

bOOK DAARIO IS. OUT OF CONTROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOLLLL

Oberyn Nymeros Martell, Tyrion muttered under his breath as he fell in beside the man. The Red Viper of Dorne. And what in the seven hells am I supposed to do with him? He knew the man only by reputation, to be sure… but the reputation was fearsome. When he was no more than sixteen, Prince Oberyn had been found abed with the paramour of old Lord Yronwood, a huge man of fierce repute and short temper. A duel ensued, though in view of the prince’s youth and high birth, it was only to first blood. Both men took cuts, and honor was satisfied. Yet Prince Oberyn soon recovered, while Lord Yronwood’s wounds festered and killed him. Afterward men whispered that Oberyn had fought with a poisoned sword, and ever thereafter friends and foes alike called him the Red Viper. 

GoT Translated (X)

royalstyle:

"Year Of The Three Kings”
Postcard with the photos of George V, Edward VIII and George VI, the three Kings of England who each ruled in 1936. Dates included.
Credit to Galt Museum & Archives.

royalstyle:

"Year Of The Three Kings”

Postcard with the photos of George V, Edward VIII and George VI, the three Kings of England who each ruled in 1936. Dates included.

Credit to Galt Museum & Archives.

royalstyle:

Anna Maria Russell, Duchess of Bedford
A lifelong friend of Queen Victoria, whom she served as a Lady of the Bedchamber between 1837 and 1841. The Duchess is best remembered as the creator of the British meal afternoon tea.
Whilst visiting the 5th Duke of Rutland at Belvoir Castle in the 18th century, dinner came to be served later and later in the day, the normal time being between 7:00 and 8:30 p.m. An extra meal called luncheon had been created to fill the midday gap between breakfast and dinner, but as this new meal was very light, the long afternoon with no refreshment at all left people feeling hungry.
The Duchess found a light meal of tea (usually Darjeeling) and cakes or sandwiches was the perfect balance. She found taking an afternoon snack to be such a perfect refreshment that she soon began inviting her friends to join her. Afternoon tea quickly became an established and convivial repast in many middle and upper class households.
Portrait by by John Cochran, after G.R. Wood stipple engraving, published 1834 © National Portrait Gallery

royalstyle:

Anna Maria Russell, Duchess of Bedford

A lifelong friend of Queen Victoria, whom she served as a Lady of the Bedchamber between 1837 and 1841. The Duchess is best remembered as the creator of the British meal afternoon tea.

Whilst visiting the 5th Duke of Rutland at Belvoir Castle in the 18th century, dinner came to be served later and later in the day, the normal time being between 7:00 and 8:30 p.m. An extra meal called luncheon had been created to fill the midday gap between breakfast and dinner, but as this new meal was very light, the long afternoon with no refreshment at all left people feeling hungry.

The Duchess found a light meal of tea (usually Darjeeling) and cakes or sandwiches was the perfect balance. She found taking an afternoon snack to be such a perfect refreshment that she soon began inviting her friends to join her. Afternoon tea quickly became an established and convivial repast in many middle and upper class households.

Portrait by by John Cochran, after G.R. Wood stipple engraving, published 1834 © National Portrait Gallery

royalstyle:

The Last Prince of Cambridge
His Royal Highness Prince George William Frederick Charles, 2nd Duke of Cambridge, Prince of Hanover, Duke of Brunswick and Lüneburg, Royal Knight Companion of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle.
Born 26 March 1819, Prince George was a member of the British Royal Family, a male-line grandson of King George III and maternal uncle of Queen Mary (grandmother to the current monarch Elizabeth II).
Prince George was known to be quite controversial, not believing in prearranged marriages and memorably quoted as saying “arranged marriages were doomed to failure." It is believed his uncle William IV, had hopes of steering him to eventually marry his cousin Princess Victoria of Kent. The prospective match was favoured by George’s own parents, but this was forestalled by Victoria’s maternal-uncle Leopold I of Belgium securing her betrothal to his nephew (their mutual cousin) Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.
George later went on to marry one of his many mistresses privately, against the wishes of Queen Victoria. As the marriage was contrary to the Royal Marriages Act, the Duke’s ‘wife’ was not titled Duchess of Cambridge or accorded the style Her Royal Highness, nor was their son considered legitimate and able to succeed to the Duke’s titles.
His title, Duke of Cambridge, fell into extinction upon his death. It was not revived until 107 years later, when Queen Elizabeth II awarded the title to her grandson, Prince William, on 29 April 2011, the day he married Catherine Middleton.
Portrait by Walery, published by Sampson Low & Co. 1888
© National Portrait Gallery

royalstyle:

The Last Prince of Cambridge

His Royal Highness Prince George William Frederick Charles, 2nd Duke of Cambridge, Prince of Hanover, Duke of Brunswick and Lüneburg, Royal Knight Companion of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle.

Born 26 March 1819, Prince George was a member of the British Royal Family, a male-line grandson of King George III and maternal uncle of Queen Mary (grandmother to the current monarch Elizabeth II).

Prince George was known to be quite controversial, not believing in prearranged marriages and memorably quoted as saying “arranged marriages were doomed to failure." It is believed his uncle William IV, had hopes of steering him to eventually marry his cousin Princess Victoria of Kent. The prospective match was favoured by George’s own parents, but this was forestalled by Victoria’s maternal-uncle Leopold I of Belgium securing her betrothal to his nephew (their mutual cousin) Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

George later went on to marry one of his many mistresses privately, against the wishes of Queen Victoria. As the marriage was contrary to the Royal Marriages Act, the Duke’s ‘wife’ was not titled Duchess of Cambridge or accorded the style Her Royal Highness, nor was their son considered legitimate and able to succeed to the Duke’s titles.

His title, Duke of Cambridge, fell into extinction upon his death. It was not revived until 107 years later, when Queen Elizabeth II awarded the title to her grandson, Prince William, on 29 April 2011, the day he married Catherine Middleton.

Portrait by Walery, published by Sampson Low & Co. 1888

© National Portrait Gallery

not-your-normal-good-girl:

girlsbydaylight:

Disney Families by Grodansnagel

I can’t function

edmyguidinglight:

Was surprised this parallel gifset hadn’t been done, yet i’ve seen so much discussion on it. mars-wan-kenobi for you. :)